318 Lolita (with Jenny Minton Quigley)

Jacke hosts Jenny Minton Quigley, editor of the new collection LOLITA IN THE AFTERLIFE: On Beauty, Risk, and Reckoning with the Most Indelible and Shocking Novel of the Twentieth Century, for a discussion of Vladimir Nabokov’s classic (and controversial) 1958 novel.

Jenny Minton Quigley is the daughter of Lolita’s original publisher in America, Walter J. Minton.

Lolita in the Afterlife includes contributions by the following twenty-first century literary luminaries:

Robin Givhan • Aleksandar Hemon • Jim Shepard • Emily Mortimer • Laura Lippman • Erika L. Sánchez • Sarah Weinman • Andre Dubus III • Mary Gaitskill • Zainab Salbi • Christina Baker Kline • Ian Frazier • Cheryl Strayed • Sloane Crosley • Victor LaValle • Jill Kargman • Lila Azam Zanganeh • Roxane Gay • Claire Dederer • Jessica Shattuck • Stacy Schiff • Susan Choi • Kate Elizabeth Russell • Tom Bissell • Kira Von Eichel • Bindu Bansinath • Dani Shapiro • Alexander Chee • Lauren Groff • Morgan Jerkins

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2 thoughts on “318 Lolita (with Jenny Minton Quigley)”

  1. When considering Lolita, one must see Sarah Weinman’s new book “The Real Lolita”. Weinman’s through research does much more than describe what happened to the kidnapped and raped real child who inspired Nabokov’s work. She explains in detail how Nabokov’s story parallels the real events, and the hypocrisy of the efforts of Nabokov’s wife in particular to insist that his novel’s story was all from his imagination.

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